Asparagus Poem for Very Veggie Wednesday

asparagusToday is Very Veggie Wednesday! How about a poem and a recipe? The poem is from Poems on Fruits & Odes to Veggies. I happen to love asparagus and so do my kids, when I make their favorite…asparagus fries. Did you know that asparagus comes in three colors? Red, green and white?

Four More Asparagus Fun Facts:

  1. It’s high in fiber, folate and potassium.
  2. It contains bone-building vitamin K along with many antioxidants, including vitamins E, A and C.
  3. There is no fat or cholesterol in any spear
  4. Peak growing season is April through June

Asparagus Fries

Preheat oven to 400 degrees

Wash and clean your asparagus and pat dry

Cut the ends off of the end of the asparagus

Lay the asparagus on a cookie sheet

Drizzle 1/4 cup of extra virgin olive oil over asparagus and turn greens until fully coated

Sprinkle with 1 teaspoon sea salt

Roast in heated oven for 20 minutes. Keep checking until desired taste and tenderness. (My family likes ours extra crunchy). Enjoy and remember, healthy eating starts with a poem!

Asparagus by, Judith Natelli McLaughlin

Asparagus spears

Make asparagus pie,

Or asparagus quiche,

Or asparagus soup, or

Risotto. I don’t know

A thing you can’t do

With asparagus spears

Even put them in stew

     Pan roasted asparagus perfect to please

     Frittata?  De nada ­­– just add eggs and cheese.

Asparagus spears

Make asparagus salad,

Asparagus flan,

Or asparagus fry.

Packaged like pencils

In red, green or white

Put asparagus spears

On your menu tonight.

Asparagus

asparagusI was just checking up on twitter when I found a great recipe for an Asparagus Frittata! Thanks @DonnaFaz. It looks simple to make and delicious to eat. Can’t wait to make it. Check it out at Donna’s Blog: In All Directions.

And of all things, the word, frittata, a delightful word to say, makes an appearance in my Asparagus Poem, from Poems on Fruits & Odes to Veggies.

If you were ever wondering if there REALLY was such a thing as an Asparagus Frittata, now you know! Enjoy the poem, try the frittata, and remember, healthy eating starts with a poem!

Asparagus by, Judith Natelli McLaughlin

Asparagus spears

Make asparagus pie,

Or asparagus quiche,

Or asparagus soup, or

Risotto. I don’t know

A thing you can’t do

With asparagus spears

Even put them in stew

     Pan roasted asparagus perfect to please

     Frittata?  De nada ­­– just add eggs and cheese.

Asparagus spears

Make asparagus salad,

Asparagus flan,

Or asparagus fry.

Packaged like pencils

In red, green or white

Put asparagus spears

On your menu tonight.

First Harvest

harvest 1I haven’t posted any garden updates in quite a while. So long, in fact, that today I picked my first harvest! Two grape tomatoes, one beafsteak tomato and a huge bunch of basil. I popped the two grape tomatoes in my mouth immediately. Couldn’t resist and they were delicious! (In fact, I popped the first one before I snapped this pic, that’s how impatient I was). Finally, I remembered to photograph the harvest.

Tonight’s dinner? Filet Mignon, Tortellini with Homemade Pesto and a Tomato, Cucumber, Basil Salad.

Homemade Pesto

For my pesto I put the entire bunch of basil in a blender with 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, 5 cloves garlic, 1/4 cup parmesan cheese and 1/4 cup almonds. Then I blended until smooth. I needed to add a bit more olive oil to get to the consistency I like. The beauty of pesto is you can do it as you please…more garlic, less garlic, pine nuts, or walnuts or no nuts. Whatever you choose. This exact recipe was just delicious. Tweak it as you wish and let me know how you do it!

And remember, like I say in P0ems on Fruits & Odes to Veggies, healthy eating starts with a poem!

Eggplant

eggplantLet’s talk about eggplant for the rest of the week. We will discuss recipes, poems and art…let’s begin!

We are starting with a poem and illustration from my book Poems on Fruits & Odes to Veggies – Where Healthy Eating Starts With a Poem.

I love this silly poem…and when I first recited it to my children, some five years ago, they were worried that the last line in the poem would fool children into thinking eggplant really comes from eggs. So far, all the kids I read to get the joke.  Phew!

Eggplant

Crack an egg

Mix it up

Shells and yolk and all

Dig a hole

In the ground

Just as wide as tall

Pour the egg

In the hole

Using love and care

Cover it

Up with dirt

Water, sit and stare

See a leaf

Sprout right up

Don’t say that you can’t

Now you ask

What it is?

Naturally, eggplant

If you don’t believe me

Then go ask your mother

If you do believe me

I’ll tell you another

Acorn Squash Poem

squashSince we were talking about making acorn squash the other day…and since healthy eating starts with a poem…naturally it is time for me to post my Acorn Squash poem.  Drop this rhyme on your family the next time you make them acorn squash!  It is from my book Poems on Fruits & Odes to Veggies – Where Healthy Eating Starts With a Poem.

 

Acorn Squash 

The squirrel’s a brave and brazen sort

Who flies from tree to tree for sport

He hunts for acorns high and low

And saves them up for winter’s snow

When trees are bare, acorns no more

The squirrel comes up to my front door

As if to ask for food from me

“I took no acorns from your tree!”

For acorn’s not my favorite knosh

Unless it’s buttered acorn squash

Acorn Squash Recipe

squashOn Thursday evening, April 18, I was one of the guest speakers at a Barnes & Noble book event best described as teaching the teachers how to use Poems on Fruits & Odes to Veggies in their classrooms. I shared a few recipes and one teacher was so intrigued with my Acorn Squash recipe that I promised to share it on my blog. Teacher, teacher, wherever you are, can you let me know if you found the recipe here?  I would love to hear from you.

Acorn Squash

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees
  2. Cut Acorn Squash in half, lengthwise, stem to base.  It has seeds (just like a pumpkin).
  3. Scoop out the seeds until you are left with a cavity only.
  4. Fill the cavity with 2 tablespoons of butter and 1 tablespoon of brown sugar.
  5. Place halves on baking sheet and pop into oven for 1 hour.
  6. Remove squash from oven and test for doneness.  Fleshy part should be really soft (like the consistency of mashed potatoes) and tops should be a bit browned. If done let them cool a bit before using a fork to stir and mash the squash.  You can eat it right out of the shell, or plate it up.
  7. ENJOY!